April 16, 2018

The Power of Acceptance | Your Weekly Juice Episode 38

In this week’s Juice I talk about a resilience tool that is so powerful and yet so difficult to put into practice.

That is acceptance.

When things go wrong, or something happens to us that is unexpected and unwanted, we tend to get angry and resist it. I’m suggesting to embrace it. Easier said than done.

Listen to this week’s Juice for tips on how to accept both the good and the bad parts of life.

The Healing Power of Acceptance

When One Door Closes

When we feel a loss of control, when the ending does not match the story we told ourselves, we want to fix it, to put it back together. When things happen in our lives that are unexpected, when they devastate us, when things beyond our control change the trajectory of our lives our first instinct is to fight. We are flooded with emotions of hurt and anger. The door that has closed we push back it, we push against it, pounding, willing it to open again. Pleading for what we had to not be lost.

Another Door Opens

Because we are stuck focused on what has happened we can not see what lies ahead. We can’t see what opportunities lie in the wake of tragedy. We can’t see the goodness that surrounds us. When we begin to look beyond the initial hurt and pain of loss, and give ourselves permission to accept that we can not control the result but we can control how we use the outcome, our landscape changes. Acceptance brings clarity to all we have been given. Clarity to the beautiful life we have, and can have. There is light in darkness. Acceptance opens the door.

Balm to a Wounded Soul

Acceptance is not a cure. It does not mean you will no longer be sad. The hurts may remain, the disappointments still felt; but you can feel along side of it, faith, grace, hope of something better.

Acceptance does not take away our pain but it opens the door to let joy back in.

Comments 3

  1. Nice piece about acceptance Louisa!! In May I am to talk with health care professionals about how to help their geriatric patients deal with the hardships and losses in their lives. I definitely will include something about acceptance. What I’d like to propose to the audience is that their patients have a lot to learn from them. In particular, I was thinking…what kind of role model are we when we care for patients, how does our acceptance of our day show them that there are ways to deal with hardship – eg. thinking about staff who complain of short staffing for example. How can we help our patients through our role-modeling and our coaching on how their lives might be made better by accepting what they cannot change. Do you know if eliciting positive emotions through savouring helps an individual to be more capable of acceptance? Love to hear your thoughts! Thank you for sharing your work.
    sincerely,
    Cathy

Please leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *